highfield rugby logo
                                                                                                                                                                                

Highfield RFC Positive Mental Health Policy
in association with Suicide Aware
(Amber Flag)


There is no health without mental health.
Positive mental health includes self-esteem, the ability to solve problems and the ability to adapt to mental stresses.



How to Promote Positive Mental Health:



If approached by someone seeking assistance some of the following points may help:
  1. Be there.
    The best thing you can do for someone with depression is to be there and express to them how important they are.
  2. Try a small gesture.
    Text, call, go for a meal.
  3. Don’t judge or criticize.
    What you say can have a powerful impact on an individual. Avoid saying statements such as: “You just need to see things as half full, not half empty” or “I think this is really all just in your head.”
  4. Avoid the tough-love approach.
    Many individuals think that being tough on the individual will undo their depression or inspire positive behavioral changes. But consider that this is as useless, hurtful and harmful as ignoring, pushing away or not helping someone who has cancer.
  5. Don’t minimize their pain.
    Statements such as, “You’re just too thin-skinned” or “Why do you let every little thing bother you?” shame a person with depression. It invalidates what they’re experiencing and completely glosses over the fact that they’re struggling with a difficult disorder – not some weakness or personality flaw.
  6. Avoid offering advice.
    What helps instead is to ask, “What can we do to help you feel better?” This gives the individual the opportunity to ask for help. When a person asks for help they are more inclined to be guided and take direction without feeling insulted.
  7. Avoid making comparisons.
    Unless you’ve experienced a depressive episode yourself, saying that you know how a person with depression feels is not helpful.
  8. Learn as much as you can about the issue.
    You can avoid the above missteps and misunderstandings simply by educating yourself about the issue.
  9. Be patient.
    But remember that just by being there and asking how you can help can be an incredible gift.
  10. Support
    Let them know that you and others care about them and are available for support. Offer to drive them to treatment or, if they want to talk to you about how they're feeling, know what to listen for.
  11. Listen and Don’t make promises
    It is very important to be a caring ear to someone who approaches you. Don’t, however, promise anything as the individual will feel let down if the promise cannot be fulfilled.

IF YOU ARE APPROACHED BY AN INDIVIDUAL WHO IS UNDER THE AGE OF 18 YOU MUST INFORM THEIR PARENT/GUARDIAN.

If you are approached by someone looking for help, and are unsure what to do, contact one of the club liaisons or any of the centres listed below. Alternatively, check online for various organisations that can help.

If you feel someone is in imminent danger to themselves or others get them to a hospital or contact the authorities for help.

NEVER PUT YOURSELF IN HARMS WAY!



CONTACTS
SUICIDE AWARE : 087-9454202
AWARE : 1890 303 302
JIGSAW(12-18 YEAR OLDS) : 066 718 6785
kerry@jigsaw.ie
SAMARITANS: 1850609090
Text: 087-2609090
email: jo@samaritans.org
Pieta House : 021-4341400
GARDAÍ/AMBULANCE : 999



CLUB LIAISONS
DARA Ó TUAMA : 086-1722344
ROBERT BOGUE : 087-2273580
LAURA GUEST : 087-9749845
KIERAN GOLDEN : 087-2227739
PHILIP NEWTON : 087-2521280
DON O’SULLIVAN : 087-2024566
DAVE BARRY : 087-2568661
JOE EUSTACE : 086-3805610
GETHIN LEWIS : 086-1948543